LiehSugai_Izumo_Statement.jpg
 Overlooking the Miho Bay in Mihonoseki, Izumo province, an ancient port town closely associated with mythology and located on the eastern tip of the Shimane Peninsula, in the Sea of Japan.  In the words of Japan’s first Nobel laureate, Hideki Yukawa: “Mihonoseki is one of the few places where you can find the roots of the Japanese soul.”

Overlooking the Miho Bay in Mihonoseki, Izumo province, an ancient port town closely associated with mythology and located on the eastern tip of the Shimane Peninsula, in the Sea of Japan.

In the words of Japan’s first Nobel laureate, Hideki Yukawa: “Mihonoseki is one of the few places where you can find the roots of the Japanese soul.”

 The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. The man who is responsible for the lantern touch keeps the fire alive during the ceremony.

The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. The man who is responsible for the lantern touch keeps the fire alive during the ceremony.

 Surrounded by the rich forest of the Shimane Peninsula and overlooking Miho Bay, Miho Shrine is the head of more than 3,000 dedicated to Ebisu, divinity of the sea, merchants and music.  This small town of Mihonoseki is home to many rituals. Two of the most important ones are based on stories in the Kojiki (“Record of Ancient Matters”), the oldest existing record of Japanese mythology.

Surrounded by the rich forest of the Shimane Peninsula and overlooking Miho Bay, Miho Shrine is the head of more than 3,000 dedicated to Ebisu, divinity of the sea, merchants and music.

This small town of Mihonoseki is home to many rituals. Two of the most important ones are based on stories in the Kojiki (“Record of Ancient Matters”), the oldest existing record of Japanese mythology.

 “Ondo” (left) and “Tomodo” (right) girls sit in front of the altar during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

“Ondo” (left) and “Tomodo” (right) girls sit in front of the altar during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

 Sakura (cherry blossoms) blooming under the night sky at the peak of Sakura season. The Aofushigaki Ritual is held during Sakura season, every early spring.

Sakura (cherry blossoms) blooming under the night sky at the peak of Sakura season. The Aofushigaki Ritual is held during Sakura season, every early spring.

 Mrs. Yanai worships at the Aofushigaki Ritual every year.

Mrs. Yanai worships at the Aofushigaki Ritual every year.

 Reflection on a koi pond. Koi fish symbolizes good fortune/luck and also have a deep connection to Ebisu, the god of fishermen and luck.

Reflection on a koi pond. Koi fish symbolizes good fortune/luck and also have a deep connection to Ebisu, the god of fishermen and luck.

 Mt. Daisen (大山), a sacred mountain and a residence of Shinto deities, seen across Miho Bay.

Mt. Daisen (大山), a sacred mountain and a residence of Shinto deities, seen across Miho Bay.

 “Sasara” boy in the Aofushigaki Ritual.

“Sasara” boy in the Aofushigaki Ritual.

 Kannushi (Shinto priest) zouri sandals lined up inside the shrine.

Kannushi (Shinto priest) zouri sandals lined up inside the shrine.

 Ujiko people during the Aofushigaki Ritual. Ujiko are dedicated to the belief in and worship of the shrine and they play a crucial part in the rituals at Miho Shrine. This status has been passed down through the generations for hundreds of years.

Ujiko people during the Aofushigaki Ritual. Ujiko are dedicated to the belief in and worship of the shrine and they play a crucial part in the rituals at Miho Shrine. This status has been passed down through the generations for hundreds of years.

 Flags waves in the sea breeze from Miho Bay at the main road approaching Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual, a Shinto ritual that takes place in Mihonoseki, Izumo province.

Flags waves in the sea breeze from Miho Bay at the main road approaching Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual, a Shinto ritual that takes place in Mihonoseki, Izumo province.

 A demon mask watches over the Miho Shrine.

A demon mask watches over the Miho Shrine.

 Tomodo girls and Ujiko during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Tomodo girls and Ujiko during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

 Sakaki leaves held high in front of the gate of Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Sakaki leaves held high in front of the gate of Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual.

 Hanaikada (花筏), floral raft, at the end of Sakura (cherry blossom) season.

Hanaikada (花筏), floral raft, at the end of Sakura (cherry blossom) season.

 The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. A Kannushi (Shinto priest) watches the preparation of the ritual.

The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. A Kannushi (Shinto priest) watches the preparation of the ritual.

 Shijimi clam fishermen on Lake Shinji, Matsue, in early-morning fog.

Shijimi clam fishermen on Lake Shinji, Matsue, in early-morning fog.

 Sacred bamboo next to the main shrine.

Sacred bamboo next to the main shrine.

 Umbrellas lined up at Miho Shrine.

Umbrellas lined up at Miho Shrine.

 A ritual participant waits outside during the ceremony.

A ritual participant waits outside during the ceremony.

 Sun setting over Lake Shinji (宍道湖) in Matsue, Izumo province. Matsue is my father’s hometown, my ancestors’ resting place and the site of many rituals.

Sun setting over Lake Shinji (宍道湖) in Matsue, Izumo province. Matsue is my father’s hometown, my ancestors’ resting place and the site of many rituals.

 Senkou hanabi (線香花火), traditional Japanese fireworks, sparking my childhood memories.

Senkou hanabi (線香花火), traditional Japanese fireworks, sparking my childhood memories.

 For the Japanese, Sakura is an enduring expression of life, death and renewal. It is a timeless metaphor for the acceptance of the transience of all life.

For the Japanese, Sakura is an enduring expression of life, death and renewal. It is a timeless metaphor for the acceptance of the transience of all life.

LiehSugai_Izumo_Statement.jpg
 Overlooking the Miho Bay in Mihonoseki, Izumo province, an ancient port town closely associated with mythology and located on the eastern tip of the Shimane Peninsula, in the Sea of Japan.  In the words of Japan’s first Nobel laureate, Hideki Yukawa: “Mihonoseki is one of the few places where you can find the roots of the Japanese soul.”
 The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. The man who is responsible for the lantern touch keeps the fire alive during the ceremony.
 Surrounded by the rich forest of the Shimane Peninsula and overlooking Miho Bay, Miho Shrine is the head of more than 3,000 dedicated to Ebisu, divinity of the sea, merchants and music.  This small town of Mihonoseki is home to many rituals. Two of the most important ones are based on stories in the Kojiki (“Record of Ancient Matters”), the oldest existing record of Japanese mythology.
 “Ondo” (left) and “Tomodo” (right) girls sit in front of the altar during the Aofushigaki Ritual.
 Sakura (cherry blossoms) blooming under the night sky at the peak of Sakura season. The Aofushigaki Ritual is held during Sakura season, every early spring.
 Mrs. Yanai worships at the Aofushigaki Ritual every year.
 Reflection on a koi pond. Koi fish symbolizes good fortune/luck and also have a deep connection to Ebisu, the god of fishermen and luck.
 Mt. Daisen (大山), a sacred mountain and a residence of Shinto deities, seen across Miho Bay.
 “Sasara” boy in the Aofushigaki Ritual.
 Kannushi (Shinto priest) zouri sandals lined up inside the shrine.
 Ujiko people during the Aofushigaki Ritual. Ujiko are dedicated to the belief in and worship of the shrine and they play a crucial part in the rituals at Miho Shrine. This status has been passed down through the generations for hundreds of years.
 Flags waves in the sea breeze from Miho Bay at the main road approaching Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual, a Shinto ritual that takes place in Mihonoseki, Izumo province.
 A demon mask watches over the Miho Shrine.
 Tomodo girls and Ujiko during the Aofushigaki Ritual.
 Sakaki leaves held high in front of the gate of Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual.
 Hanaikada (花筏), floral raft, at the end of Sakura (cherry blossom) season.
 The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. A Kannushi (Shinto priest) watches the preparation of the ritual.
 Shijimi clam fishermen on Lake Shinji, Matsue, in early-morning fog.
 Sacred bamboo next to the main shrine.
 Umbrellas lined up at Miho Shrine.
 A ritual participant waits outside during the ceremony.
 Sun setting over Lake Shinji (宍道湖) in Matsue, Izumo province. Matsue is my father’s hometown, my ancestors’ resting place and the site of many rituals.
 Senkou hanabi (線香花火), traditional Japanese fireworks, sparking my childhood memories.
 For the Japanese, Sakura is an enduring expression of life, death and renewal. It is a timeless metaphor for the acceptance of the transience of all life.

Overlooking the Miho Bay in Mihonoseki, Izumo province, an ancient port town closely associated with mythology and located on the eastern tip of the Shimane Peninsula, in the Sea of Japan.

In the words of Japan’s first Nobel laureate, Hideki Yukawa: “Mihonoseki is one of the few places where you can find the roots of the Japanese soul.”

The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. The man who is responsible for the lantern touch keeps the fire alive during the ceremony.

Surrounded by the rich forest of the Shimane Peninsula and overlooking Miho Bay, Miho Shrine is the head of more than 3,000 dedicated to Ebisu, divinity of the sea, merchants and music.

This small town of Mihonoseki is home to many rituals. Two of the most important ones are based on stories in the Kojiki (“Record of Ancient Matters”), the oldest existing record of Japanese mythology.

“Ondo” (left) and “Tomodo” (right) girls sit in front of the altar during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Sakura (cherry blossoms) blooming under the night sky at the peak of Sakura season. The Aofushigaki Ritual is held during Sakura season, every early spring.

Mrs. Yanai worships at the Aofushigaki Ritual every year.

Reflection on a koi pond. Koi fish symbolizes good fortune/luck and also have a deep connection to Ebisu, the god of fishermen and luck.

Mt. Daisen (大山), a sacred mountain and a residence of Shinto deities, seen across Miho Bay.

“Sasara” boy in the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Kannushi (Shinto priest) zouri sandals lined up inside the shrine.

Ujiko people during the Aofushigaki Ritual. Ujiko are dedicated to the belief in and worship of the shrine and they play a crucial part in the rituals at Miho Shrine. This status has been passed down through the generations for hundreds of years.

Flags waves in the sea breeze from Miho Bay at the main road approaching Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual, a Shinto ritual that takes place in Mihonoseki, Izumo province.

A demon mask watches over the Miho Shrine.

Tomodo girls and Ujiko during the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Sakaki leaves held high in front of the gate of Miho Shrine on the day of the Aofushigaki Ritual.

Hanaikada (花筏), floral raft, at the end of Sakura (cherry blossom) season.

The night before the Aofushigaki Ritual at Miho Shrine. A Kannushi (Shinto priest) watches the preparation of the ritual.

Shijimi clam fishermen on Lake Shinji, Matsue, in early-morning fog.

Sacred bamboo next to the main shrine.

Umbrellas lined up at Miho Shrine.

A ritual participant waits outside during the ceremony.

Sun setting over Lake Shinji (宍道湖) in Matsue, Izumo province. Matsue is my father’s hometown, my ancestors’ resting place and the site of many rituals.

Senkou hanabi (線香花火), traditional Japanese fireworks, sparking my childhood memories.

For the Japanese, Sakura is an enduring expression of life, death and renewal. It is a timeless metaphor for the acceptance of the transience of all life.

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